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What DVD titles are available?

 

DVD started off slowly. Rosy predictions of hundreds of movie titles for Christmas of 1996 failed to materialize. Only a handful of DVD titles, mostly music videos, were available in Japan for the November 1996 launch of DVD. The first feature films on DVD appeared in Japan on December 20 (The Assassin, Blade Runner, Eraser, and The Fugitive from Warner Home Video). By April, 1997 there were over 150 titles in Japan. The first titles released in the U.S., on March 19, 1997, by Lumivision, authored by AIX Entertainment, were IMAX adaptations: Africa: The Serengeti, Antarctica: An Adventure of a Different Nature, Tropical Rainforest, and Animation Greats. (Other movies such as Batman and Space Jam had been demonstrated earlier, but were not full versions available for sale.) The Warner Bros. U.S. launch followed on March 24, but was limited to seven cities. Almost 19,000 discs were purchased in the first two weeks of the US launch -- more than expected. InfoTech predicted over 600 titles by the end of 1997 and more than 8,000 titles by 2000. By December 1997, over 1 million individual DVD discs were shipped, representing about 530 titles. By the end of 1999, over 100 million discs had shipped, representing about 5,000 titles. By the end of 2000 there were over 10,000 titles available in the US and over 15,000 worldwide. By the end of 2001 there were about 14,000 titles available in the U.S. By the end of 2002 there were about 23,000 titles available in the U.S. By March 2003, six years after launch, over 1.5 billion copies of DVD titles had been shipped. Compared to other launches (CD, LD, etc.) these are a huge numbers of titles released in a very short time. (Note that these numbers don't include adult titles, which account for an additional 15% or so.) Just over 10,000 new DVD titles were released in 2003, and almost 11,000 came out in 2004, for a total of 42,500 titles (with about 40,300 still available). It would cost you about $800,000 to buy one copy of each.

A number of DVD launches in Europe were announced with little follow-through, but DVD began to become established in Europe around the end of 1998. Availability of DVDs in Europe was initially about 18 months to a year behind the U.S., but has shortened over the years to a delay of only a few weeks to a few months.

DVD-Audio started even slower than DVD-Video. The first commercially available DVD-Audio title, Big Phat Band, was released in October 2000 on the Silverline label of 5.1 Entertainment. Major music labels BMG Entertainment, EMI Music, Universal Music, and Warner Music have committed to DVD-Audio titles, although in fall 2001 Universal announced that it would release SACD titles first. As of the end of 2001, just under 200 DVD-Audio titles were available. The first SACD titles were released in Japan in May 1999.

DVD-ROM computer software is slowly appearing. Many initial DVD-ROM titles were only available as part of a hardware or software bundle. IDC predicted that over 13 percent of all software would be available in DVD-ROM format by the end of 1998, but reality didn't meet expectations. In one sense, DVD-ROMs are simply larger faster CD-ROMs and contain the same material. In many cases CD-ROMs are big enough that there's no need to move to DVD-ROMs. But DVD-ROMs can also take advantage of the high-quality video and multi-channel audio capabilities being added to many DVD-ROM-equipped computers.

Some rental chains such as Blockbuster and retailers such as Wal-Mart originally carried only fullscreen (pan and scan) versions of movies when both widescreen and fullscreen versions were available. This infuriated many DVD fans, who could never countenance watching a non-widescreen version of a movie on DVD. There was much complaining, including an online petition with over 25,000 signatures. In early 2003 Blockbuster reversed their policy with the following statement: “We made a decision to purchase the majority of titles we bring in on DVD in the widescreen format. We try to follow our customer preferences. As DVD becomes increasingly popular, they become more familiar with the features and with the benefits of letterboxing. They've learned it's a superior format to full-frame." Wal-Mart similarly switched to widescreen versions apparently after realizing that they sold better.

 

 

Introduction to Any DVD Shrink

Any DVD Shrink is a powerful DVD copy and burning software, which can decode and clone copy-protected movie DVD and non-protected DVDs for you for storage and collections, or burn ISO image and DVD folder on hard drive to DVD and burn DVDs among different DVD discs. It enables you to copy you movie DVDs to hard drive in dvd folder or ISO image file formats, or clone DVD movies from one dvd disc from anther one, even compress DVDs automatically when necessary. It is so easy to use, backup your costly DVDs within a few clicks.